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landlord-tenant law Archives

Recent NYC tenant protections broad-based, with teeth

New York City legislators have been notably busy over the past several months drafting local laws that a recent New York Law Journal article notes are intended to materially expand tenant protections. The newly enacted statutory housing provisions apply to rent-stabilized and rent-controlled residents across the city.

NYC renters thinking about Airbnb listings need to be in the know

Himmelstein, McConnell, Gribben, Donoghue & Joseph attorneys provide strong and proven representation to NYC tenants, condo unit owners and co-op shareholders across the virtual universe of housing-related concerns. We note on our Manhattan law firm's website that HMGDJ advocates on behalf of our valued clients "in disputes over evictions, rent increases, rental-owner conversions and other issues."

Strong adverse spotlight targets Facebook in housing lawsuit

Any article discussing Facebook might reasonably lead off with reference to its size and clout. A recent New York Times piece refers to the company as an "advertising behemoth," which is certainly the case. Reportedly, Facebook users total more than two billion a month. The globe's largest social network site took in an estimated $40 billion in ad revenues last year.

New York Loft Law reformists want action from NYC Mayor de Blasio

Time passes quickly, and advocates for material changes in the state's Loft Law who were clearly buoyed by NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio's rhetoric late last autumn now want to see resulting action.
The mayor addressed Brooklyn residents at a town hall meeting in October, using the forum to announce "big changes" his administration would make to the law this year.
Advocates for reform -- which they say is long overdue and must bring material revisions more protective to tenants -- are now waiting.
And, given de Blasio's words, they are expectant. The mayor is on record as decrying a Loft Law philosophy pushed under predecessor Michael Bloomberg's administration that he alleges inadequately protected loft tenants while unfairly favoring landlords.
That approach "was wrong," de Blasio said. He has voiced support for eliminating obstacles that undercut support for affordable housing generally, and particularly for "artists and cultural workers" seeking unit conversion under the Loft Law.
Although the Loft Law is partially understand by many, provisions addressing it are notably complex. The law contains a number of legal twists and turns, as well as nuanced language that can make full comprehension a studied task. There is a timing requirement relevant to filing registration applications, as well as varied eligibility periods set forth for residents who lived in buildings potentially subject to the law in different decades.
Additionally, any building sought to be covered by the law cannot possess a residential certificate of occupancy, and it must have been used at one time for commercial, warehouse or manufacturing purposes.
Questions or concerns regarding the Loft Law and the process for converting a building space into a legal residence can be directed to an experienced NYC tenants' rights law firm.

Material issues persist in notable tenants' displacement case

The apartment complex at 85 Bowery in Manhattan's Chinatown neighborhood continues to garner major media ink for reasons linked to what tenant advocates say is bad-faith conduct on the part of owner Joseph Betesh.

Relief for NYC tenants in buildings turned into illegal hotels

In a statement addressing his recent landmark money settlement with the NYC mayoral Office of Special Enforcement, a Manhattan owner of multiple apartment buildings in Midtown termed the affair "a regrettable process."