Himmelstein, McConnell, Gribben, Donoghue & Joseph LLP - Manhattan Tenant Rights and Representation Attorney
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Call Toll Free: 888-282-8431

Thoughts focused on cold for many thousands of NYC renters

Some New York City residents are more insulated from the cold than others. As for the latter group, some say that the past several days have left them feeling as though winter is proceeding at full blast inside their dwellings.

"It felt like the outdoors in here," noted one Queens apartment resident who lives in a NYC Housing Authority development.

Her comment has been echoed by thousands of other New Yorkers who have been coping with unquestionably brutal weather conditions. Winds have whipped, temperatures have plummeted and, as a recent New York Times article notes, snow fall totals have broken records in several boroughs.

Amidst the misery for many is an additional headache for the NYCHA, which is being solidly criticized in many quarters for reportedly neglecting badly needed updates and repairs of heating equipment in its buildings.

That especially means boilers and radiators, which have been malfunctioning in high numbers. The Times reports that failed heating units in agency buildings across the city left about 15,000 residents without heat for some period during the recent bone-chilling weather.

Some readers might understandably have questions regarding city heat regulations . They should know that "heat season" is officially operative until May 31.

That means this: Building owners need to keep the heat set to at least 68 degrees between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m., provided that the outside temperature is less than 55 degrees. And thermostats can fall no lower than 62 from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. regardless of what the temperature is outside. A good idea is to get a thermometer and keep a log of indoor and outdoor temperatures as well as call 311 to make a complaint.

If a landlord is not adequately responding to heat concerns, an affected resident might reasonably want to reach out to an experienced tenants' right attorney for advice.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information