Himmelstein, McConnell, Gribben, Donoghue & Joseph - Manhattan Tenant Rights and Representation Attorney
Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Call Toll Free: 888-282-8431

Being on this list is no badge of honor

Reportedly, "no one was picking up the phone" at any of the several New York City properties of a landlord who was prominently cited in a recent media report.

Here's why: He tops a housing-related list that nobody wants to be on.

That succinctly stated ledger-type entry is termed the "100 Worst Landlords in New York City." For obvious reasons, entrants will go to great lengths to avoid being cornered by reporters for grilling on substandard management practices and outcomes.

Those prominently include dwelling conditions marked by evident danger and unsanitary living conditions.

The list has been released annually since 2010, its stated principal author being the city's Public Advocate, who centrally acts as a watchdog for New Yorkers on various matters.

As important as safe and sanitary housing is, it is small surprise that the 100 Worst list garners more than a modicum of attention each year. City Mayor Bill de Blasio -- who once served as Public Advocate himself -- calls the numbered landlord call out "a critically important resource for tenants."

The list cites dwelling violations based on details compiled by the city's Department of Housing Preservation and Development and Department of Buildings, respectively. The landlords' ranking proceeds from worst to so-called "least worst."

The violations are myriad and often flatly egregious. The above-media article points to things like insect infestation, mold, dripping ceilings, busted locks, mice intrusions and more. In one apartment building alone, city officials flagged 38 Class C violations (the worst type, tagged as "immediately hazardous" and requiring remedy with 24 hours of notice).

This year's leader had the dubious distinction of being runner-up last year. His cited violations at the eight buildings he owns totaled more than 2,000 during the reporting period this time around.